Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
STATION
CNNW 6
CNBC 5
FBC 3
MSNBCW 2
MSNBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19
and say we didn't go off the fiscal cliff and the debt goes from $16 trillion to $20 trillion a couple years down the road to $25 trillion. nothing changes in washington, dc. you tax. you still spend. maybe it is time to take the medicine congressman and go over the fiscal cliff and fix the problem. >>guest: there is no fiscal cliff. there is a fiscal slope. the earth doesn't stop spinning, the sun will come up, the moon will come up and we will have to do things in john. taxes will go up and the democratic party and hopefully some responsible republicans will vote to make certain that we remove this tax cut that would take place. >>eric: no talk about responsible democrats to stop spending so were, or cut back the spending, not just cutting back the increase rate in spending but item spending cuts. >>guest: the rate of increase doesn't have anything to do with the spain people are suffering whether they are middle class or poor. we were talking about the so-called fiscal cliff, if that happens, automatically taxes are going to go up for everyone. maybe, then, someone would ask, who wa
a function of doing both of the things you talk about, joe. having an agreement to avoid the debt, the fiscal cliff, and then having a down payment on actually getting the $4 trillion identified. >> howard dean is a deficit hawk. liberal, but he is a deficit hawk. he doesn't say maybe if we can't get a deal together, maybe we'd be okay with the fiscal cliff. he says that is the best deal for everyone, the best deal for progressives, just to do it. to go back to the clinton era rates. you get rid of three quarters of the deficit just on tax increases at that point. >> and he says you get defense cuts. >> you can't get defense cuts any other way. and he's not the only one. there's a lot of people on the left and there's quite a few people on the right. i'm glad you're optimistic and a lot of ceos and guys in your position -- if you run a company, you don't need consumers petrified and business people petrified. this is the last thing we need if you run a company. i understand you have a horse in the game. >> but you also have the double trigger. if you go over the cliff, we've got the debt ceil
on the debt. >>> all the numbers indicate that going off the fiscal cliff would hurt the u.s. economy in the short term. but could it be the best thing in the long run? going off that fiscal cliff. to this point most of the conversation has been focused on what happens in january, and for good reason. there's no deal in congress. tax rates go up for a lot of folks, all americans. and a $1.2 trillion worth of defense and spending cuts will be automatically enacted. excuse me, that fiscal cough i told you about. the alternative minimum tax kicks in and put it all together and the results are pretty. the economy would contract by half a percent in 2013. unemployment would raise to 9.1% and the economy would experience what cbo said would be judged as a recession. but after that, then things start to look pretty good. the cbo says after next year by the agency's estimates economic growth will pick up. the labor market will strengthen returning output to its potential level. 5.5% by 2018. essentially if no deal is struck, the federal government would be forced to do what it's refused to do
. >>> back to our conversation on the so-called fiscal cliff. the debt reducing tax hikes and federal spending cuts coming january 1st unless congress and the president act. so now both sides have offers on the table, the democrats' plan which would focus debt reduction on higher tax rates for the wealthiest 2%. house republicans, they anted up yesterday with a plan to cut the debt through tax code and spending reforms, not through higher tax rates for the wealthy. if there is no agreement, you know the deal, everyone, everyone's taxes go up. representative tom price of georgia joins me now from capitol hill. he is a hard line republican. congressman, good to see you. thanks for coming on. >> yes, thank you so much. good to be with you. >> the republican plan published yesterday, it is note worthry, congressman price, it would raise more money through the tax system this and is a pretty big departure for your republican party. i just want to know, do you support this proposal put forward by the speaker of the house? >> well, this proposal is just part of the overall package. remember,
it get rid of the fiscal cliffs and no longer give congress full power to extend the debt. but i think, i'll tell you what, i'm kind of curious to see the other guys, i think we're going over the fiscal cliff because i think that congress would much rather have us go over the fiscal cliff and then vote to lower taxes and increase spending and they can't bare to raise taxes and reduce spending and that's where we'll end up in three months and have a vote to lower taxes and increase spending. >> jonas what does it do in the short-term, i know you're talking long-term. but short. >> they're scaring everybody about this, like we've got to keep pushing on or the world is going to end and it's not as bad a the politicians are pretending it is even. look, it's not a good thing, but psyched into a level and it will be worse than the real effect of having the tax increase on the government level and that's the danger, using it as a tool to get their policies on boats sides of doing this, and they're going to cause -- the first recession is caused by psyching themselves into it and making people sc
. president obama's first offer fiscal cliff, higher taxes, new spending and power over the debt spending. and offered by tim geithner who had tax problems in the past and today president obama is it at a toy factory campaigning for new taxes on the rich. and joining us is julia. >> hi. stuart: how are you. >> i'm great. stuart: i can't believe that you, as a regular american, want to do this to america, do you? >> i think it's because-- i don't think that this is exactly what what's going to happen. stuart: you don't think that the president will actually do this. >> no, no, i think the president has learned to negotiate. what the president would do, he would start with sort of half a loaf and negotiate and give the republicans about 75% of what they wanted. i think he's finally understood if you want to actually get to at least halfway, you have to start at extremes and meet halfway. republicans have done this all along. stuart: you agree with me, if this plan, anything like it from the president, were imposed on the economy at this time it would lead to recession. >> i think that the p
't let the taxes go up for the middle class and avoid the fiscal cliff. >> first, the fiscal cliff, relative to our nation's spending driven debt crisis is a pothole. you've got 0.3% of all americans that have million dollar incomes. this is a shell game. you can't tax your way out of this problem. i mean, you have revenues that are about the same levels they were five or six years ago, when deficits were running $100, $150 billion. now we know deficits are running $1 to $1.5 trillion. what's changed is on the spending side yet all this discussion is on the tax revenues. you can tax every millionaire 100% and run the government for two or three months. this is a spending driven crisis and it has to be solved on the spending side. until the president gets serious about it, i'm not sure what there is to talk about, soledad. >> i'm not sure that the only conversations have just been on the tax side. i actually think there have been conversations on both. at this moment, right, we're going over or toward the fiscal cliff. if you do nothing, all of our taxes are going up. why not, as a
if republicans don't budge on taxes. >> is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. >> alan simpson co-chair of the president's debt commission, says both sides are making a high stakes gamble. >> when you have leaders of parties and people of the administration saying, i think it will be to the advantage of the democrats to go off the cliff, i think it will be advantage to the republicans to go off the cliff, or the president to go off the cliff, that's like betting your country. there's stupidity involved in that. >>> syria on the bring. secretary of state hillary clinton holds emergency talks with russia as u.s. officials confirm reports that the syrian military is prepared to launch chemical weapons against its own people. >> we've made it very clear what our position is with respect to chemical weapons and i think we will discuss that and many other aspects. >> the whole world is watching. the whole world is watching very closely. and the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be consequences. >> plus, sharp criticism fro
're worried about what happens if we go over the fiscal cliff. play out the scenario for how things would go down if we actually do move past january 1 without an agreement. >> if you get lots of economist projections, you'll see the general view is the economy would have negative growth or a couple percentage points, whatever it is. near term recession impact. and that nt would be good to the economy because it's been moving its way out. what's really after people is will we be serious about fixing the long term problems of america's fiscal situation. basically having more revenue and less expenses so we can get the thing more if line. and that's pre-occupying people because they're worried about the longer term issue. if this doesn't move forward with a solution that actually starts to layout the ground work for the long term issues, it could be potentially disappointing. >> ceos say they have to lay out their plans for what they're planning on doing in january and they have to move forward with the plan that has an assumption that we don't get some sort of a solution. do you hear that fro
is standing in the way now of a fiscal cliff solution. we're back in two. >>> it wasn't until the debt ceiling lauz but born with an . >> you know, i beg to differ, mr. president. to me, i understand the use of its is a weapon but to me the real problem isn't the debt ceiling. it's the debt. the debt is the problem. you know, to have an unlimited amount of money to call upon is too much power power for one person. it's always in our country been about checks and balances but i think this administration just wants more checks and no balancing of the checkbook. that isn't the kind of check and balance that i think the people that wrote the constitution had in mind. now, let's look at it a different way, when we think of, you know, some good entertainment, there's, you know, bob hope, the road to morocco, the road to singapore. i don't think that we want to have a movie someday called the road to the weimar republic because bob hope was in the old movies. there's no hope in that new movie and i think this issue really has to be discussed. now i understand there's issues about compromise and every
to find common ground. solving the fiscal cliff in a manner that addresses the true drivers of our debt and saves american jobs will be a great way for the president to start his second term. for the country and my colleagues, we're ready to work with the president to achieve those goals. >> mr. speaker, a couple things. first, on the issue of tax rate, are you willing to accept no deal that includes some increase in those top tax rates? i'm also wondering what are final deadline on this is? how much longer can this back and forth go? when do we have to have a deal -- >> increasing tax rates draws money away from our economy that needs to be invested in our economy to put the american people back to work. it's the wrong approach. we're willing to put revenues on the table. revenues that come from closing loopholes, getting rid of special interest deductions, and not raising rates. we think it's better for the economy. pure and simple. secondly, the american people expect us to find common ground, to work together and to resolve this. frankly, sooner is better than later. >> you've been
but there's a big difference between this fiscal cliff and the full faith and credit of the united states. the american government has never defaulted on its debt. and now there are some, not the majority of republicans but some on the extreme of the republican party and they seem to be in control, who seem to want to default on our debt. that's crazy. if they cannot be entrusted with the full faith and credit of the united states, they should not have that leverage. >> paul, where were the overtures though? where were the overtures with this deal that was presented? i mean, listen, you don't have to be mensa to know delivering a deal like that was going to make mitch mcconnell laugh. where were the overtures for the democrats? >> first of all, it is an overture, the deal itself. the proposal. it's not the deal, it's the proposal. the republicans have not come with a counter proposal. why? they seem to be intent on falling on their sword for the 2% of the wealthiest americans, many of whom themselves are happy to pay a slightly higher rate the way we did when president clinton was preside
to president obama right now. >> i have fiscal cliff fatigue. thank you very much. >> sure. tracy: we all do, dennis, but we have to talk about it because congress has to deal with it. we have a new gallup poll showing 5 # 4% of the voters rate the honesty of members of congress below that of used car salesmen. dianne black of tennessee joins us from the home state to hear what the constituents are telling her. what are con constituents sayin? >> well, you know, i'm hearing -oth from my individual constituents and business owners they are really concerned about the spending problem in washington. that's not really talked about. there's a lot of focus on the other side, but there is a real need to control the spending because we know we spend more than what we bring in every year, can want continue down this path, and you'll go off the cliff. we have to resolve that by going off the drivers of the debt, the entitlement programs, and we have to talk about that. tracy: right. we're not. i'm not sure why. i think an easy fix is raise retirement age. is that on the table for the republicans? >> w
dividends as early chris presents in advance of the tax hikes coming in the fiscal cliff. so we have booz allen already downgrade. costco downgraded by fitch. brown foreman was slapped around by s&p with a downgrade. carnival got hit with a credit negative rating from moody's so on and on and on. here's the deal. we're seeing 173 companies issuing dividends. this is and indicator taxes could be go up. 2 1/2 times the rate we saw of companies issuing special dividends in 2010 when bush rates were threatened to be revoked back then including dividends. interesting part of the story executives who championed fair share, americans should sacrifice like the cofounder of costco, jim senegal is getting a special dividend and saving $4 million in taxes along with the rest of the board. the board overall is saving eight million bucks on early $29 million payout. the 1%, corporate insiders who see the cash on the balance sheet, see the tax hikes coming are saying you know what? give me the special dividend now so we don't have to pay increased tax. >> costco hitting a all-time, 52-week high today.
. this is not the whole fiscal cliff but just the sequester. $1.2 trillion of mandatory spending cuts over ten years and scheduled for january 2nd. half of that money cut in defense. half in everything else. next year alone could take $65 billion out of spending and a million jobs versus growing 2 million which is what the u.s. is on track to do now. i fully understand the government needs to spend less and spend more efficiently but how you achieve it is as important as how much you cut and the sledge hammer approach is not economically sound. now, there are targeted and measured ways to do it without driving the country in to another recession. some debate today as to whether we're in one or not but the sequester will only make things worse. congress, solve it. solve it nowme. we're all watching. housing is hot. if you have credit and money for a down payment, the perfect time to buy. nationally, affordability is the best it's been in a long time. new york city is the least affordable place in america to purchase a home. no big surprise here. home prices in new york are nearly two and a half times
to you guys. >> all right. thank you so much, steve liesman. we have breaking news on the fiscal cliff negotiations. john harwood with the details. over to you, john. >> maria, just wanted to bring you up to date on a development, which is the resumption of some staff level discussions between the congress, the speaker's office in particular, and the white house. we've been through a period where both sides, the principa s principals, the speaker and president have been striking tough lines in public, having made some initial moves towards cooperation, but word followed up no more meetings scheduled between the principals. wasn't that much going on staff to staff. that's changed today from yesterday. to you have some discussions resumed. i don't want to overplay the significance, but it is an encouraging sign for people who think that the ice had been beginning to crack around some of the positions, especially with the republicans on taxes. we may be looking for some forward movement. got to watch over the next day or so. >> this is good news, john. >> it is good news. it is an indicat
. this is about the debt. it's about the fiscal deficit. it's about our economy. it's about our future. it's about our children. and president obama is playing a very risky game. because in the end, this is his presidency. and you're going to look back and have a bar chart of deficits and debt. and there's not going to be an asterisk that says it was the republicans' fault. i think we've got to stop playing poker, work together and understand we're working to save the country. >> that might be the long game. the asterisk in history books later. right? the short gain is raising taxes. that really is what everything is focused on right now. and i think, nan, it's fair to say that could be a big problem for republicans. all polls indicate that it's going to be the republicans that hold the bag if you end up not raises taxes on people who are perceived to be very wealthy who could afford it. >> well, there is the -- there are the atmospherics and then there are the economic realities. of course, if you look at a lot of the polling surrounding the election and post election exit polling show that, in f
think the president understands what needs to be done to not only take care of the fiscal cliff but also take care of the concerns of the job creators, you know, make sure that the economy not only -- not only that we move towards a more balanced approach towards solving the debt but also that we grow the economy? did he seem to get that yesterday? >> yeah, i think without a doubt, he understood that the fiscal cliff issue was just short term in nature. it's something that needed to get moved on. but the bigger issue was still tax reform for business, making sure that businesses could be globally competitive, dealing with the immigration issues and s.t.e.m. and moving on with regulation because ultimately he did ak knowledge that it is the business community that creates jobs, and jobs are the path to growth, and growth is the path to more revenue. absolutely. >> let's go to pulitzer prize winner, jonathan capehart. jonathan, i tell you what, pieae is breaking out all over the place, howard dean admitted that we had to cut medicare. michael steele admitted we had to raise taxes. and you
with a lot of ceos, a lot of corporate boards. from your perspective, what impact is the fiscal cliff having with regard to the situation? we've seen today a number of special dividends announced, debt finance acceleration of special dividends. what is your perspective on this and the impact on corporate leaders and boards? >> you know, i think it's quite fluid. even quite fluid with individuals. you had steve ratner on here last week. he went over right after you the next day and his predictions where consumer is strong and we're seeing a big gap between where ceos are who are much more pessimistic. as steve was arguing, they're holding back and expecting the cliff is going to come and we're going to go over the cliff and the consumer and the individual investor in some cases don't understand that. and yet i just saw yesterday on another network, steve ratner was saying, you know what? i'm hearing different things now. it looks like we may, in fact, somehow keep this from careening off the cliff. so we're seeing an awful lot of people that are unsure how to read this in the course of a day.
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19